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A Theme Switcher: now this looks like the perfect way to create a high contrast version of your site:

filter: invert(100%)

Unfortunately the filter property isn't widely supported yet, and there are a few caveats that need addressed, but it looks like a really lightweight method.

In the wake of the recent Onliner Spambot breach, this is a quick reminder to add all your email addresses to Troy Hunt's Have I Been Pwned? website. If any appear on his vast list of compromised lists, or any future lists, you'll be notified. The notification will describe the type of compromise (e.g. email/password, bank details) and what details you should change (usually password).

Some basic security tips:

  • if you use a free email provider like Gmail or Outlook, then ensure 2-factor authentication is enabled - this is where you sign in to your email account and get a text message or access code on your mobile phone to complete the authorisation
  • don't open spam emails
  • turn off images in your email, and only re-enable for senders you know are legitimate
  • don't open spam emails

Microsoft Edge @font-face not displaying all fonts

At Doepud we rarely find annoying bugs with browsers these days, partly because we like to keep our CSS and JavaScript simple, but mainly because browser vendors do a great job sticking to standards and delivering a consistent experience across a wide range of devices. It was a surprise then to find, when showing a client a demo version of their new site, and on a web browser that we normally consider to be pretty decent (Microsoft Edge) a very unusual bug feature. The issue was related to @font-face, or more specifically @import, with the main headings not displaying the embedded font as expected.

Firefox, Chrome and Opera all ok... but not Edge

Everything was working fine in Firefox, Chrome and Opera but not Microsoft's Edge browser (as it happened, we also found the issue extended to Internet Explorer 11).

Media Queries

Turns out that within our CSS file, when requesting fonts (using @import) inside a media query, like this:

@charset "utf-8";

@media screen {
    //imports
        @import 'normalise';
        @import 'fonts';
...

...Microsoft Edge (and IE11 let's not forget) opted to ignore them entirely. So, moving the @import rule up and outside the @media screen resolved the issue:

@charset "utf-8";
@import 'fonts';

@media screen {
    //imports
        @import 'normalise';
...

Some things never change eh? Microsoft have always liked to do things their own way.

The ICO blog has a great post on ransomware, the despicable act of holding a business to ransom by preventing access to the files on their computer. These things always begin with a virus, usually through a spam email. Once infected your computer is locked down and access to your important files restricted. The pirates then issue a demand for payment to permit access again... or they will delete them. This is when having external backups comes in handy! Of course, the best defense is to avoid catching the virus in the first place.

Read the post: Being held to ransom?

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